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Duck Blind Etiquette

I have had the good fortune of hunting with a number of family and friends over the last few months and it has been a great ride. I have spent more hours in the duck blind than I care to admit and have enjoyed every minute of it. In doing so, I have noticed a lot of different characters and feel they need categorizing….for posterity. SO if you have ever hunted with family and friends in the duck blind you will recognize some of these characters….possibly yourself.

The Loud Mouth
This is the guy who cannot seem to shut up. He talks constantly, manipulating each conversation as if he somehow is the sole purpose the rest of us got up at 3 a.m. to go hunting. Remedy – serve peanut butter

The Neat Freak
This hunter just cannot sit still. He spends every minute cleaning the blind, picking up the floor (causing one to move his or her legs to help cleaning which causes undue stress on the rest of us. Remedy – Clean your blind ahead of time.

The Mad Caller
This hunter seems to think it is his/her sole responsibility to call in every bird that flies. He/she generally is not the best caller but feels compelled to scream at every passing bird…totally oblivious to the real calling going on at the other end of the blind. Remedy – tell them the birds are call shy and that no calling is needed.

The Control Freak
Such a hunter seems normal at first but as soon as a few birds are cupped and coming in…they yell out “take em” unloading the fury of the blind way too early and well ahead of the real duck blind boss. This usually results in a very very small collection of birds. Remedy – reprimanding¬†and making them do dishes and imposing the no talking rule. I am sad to say I have been guilty of this! (sorry Lynn)

The Nervous Nelly
Ever have that hunter in the blind that constantly worries about your decoy spread, the blind decor, too much window open, too little open, etc.? This guy will make you begin doubting your wardrobe! Remedy – experience!

The Pig
Ever have that hunter that would eat every ounce of food in the blind if given the chance? This guy/gal is game for seconds, thirds, even an early lunch and late dinner. And when the are not eating…their stomach is growling. Remedy – Bring more food (the duck blind is a celebration of good eating).

Forgetful Freddy
This guy/gal just can’t seem to both get up early and bring the proper gear. It’s as if they assume they will scare the birds to death as bringing shells is just a laborious option. They usually need ammo, a hat, gloves, pop, etc. Remedy – bring extra stuff for guests.

The Competitor
For some, the hunt is an Olympic competition. They want to shoot the most birds, shoot the least shells, get the most species of ducks…you know them! And if defeated, they will surely have an excuse. Remedy – Abandon all hope of ever out competing them.

The reality is there is room for everyone in the duck blind. It just seems to be the perfect place for all sorts of characters to come together to share camaraderie, good food and incredibly fun memories. I cannot wait until my next hunt and I truly hope some of these characters show up in my blind. The more the merrier!
Jeff

The Pig

The Pig

Serenity of the duck blind

Serenity of the duck blind

Nervous Nelly-always adjusting decoys

Nervous Nelly-always adjusting decoys

 

Somebody forgot their camo jacket...

Somebody forgot their camo jacket…

That's my boy!That’s my boy!

Some hunters even want to take over the dog's duties!

Some hunters even want to take over the dog’s duties!

About Jeff Rawlinson

Jeff is the Education Manager in the Communications Division with Game and Parks where he has worked for the last 15 years. He oversees the Hunter Education, Boater Education, Hunter Outreach and Shooting Range Development for the Commission and is a devout hunter, angler, wildlife viewer, naturalist, father and husband. He holds a BS and MS from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. He has been a Hunter Education Instructor for over 20 years, NRA firearms instructor and range officer, National Archery in the Schools Program Archery Instructor Specialist and member of the National NASP Board, sits on the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Hunter Recruitment and Retention Committee and Education Committee. Jeff is an avid handgun hunter, loves to chase turkeys in the spring, squirrel hunting enthusiast and philosopher of the outdoors. He is an avid shooter and loves to spend outdoor time with family and friends. He has a passion for exciting others about the outdoors. A history buff, Jeff is a strong supporter of our North American Model of Conservation and tries to spread the message of its importance and relevance every chance he gets.

One comment

  1. Nice blog “Short Reed”.

    If you are in the blind, I know there is at least one character there!

    Ha.

    Daryl B.

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